Wednesday, 29 August 2018 18:04

FATHER'S DAY DATA FROM ABS

All the single dads

In 2016, 76 per cent of single dads with children under 15 worked 35 hours or more a week, compared with 87 per cent of dads in couple families with children under 15. This is a slight drop from 77 per cent and 90 per cent respectively a decade earlier.

In comparison for 2016, 42 per cent of single mums with children under 15 worked 35 hours or more a week, compared with 38 per cent of mums in couple families with children under 15.

This is increase from 39 per cent for single mums and no change (38 per cent) of mums in couple families with children under 15.
Sourced from 2016 and 2006 Census.

 

 

 

 

Leave in the labour force

Levels of parental leave taken by fathers varies between occupation and industry.

In 2016-17, managers were more likely to use parental leave than those in non-managerial roles (true for mothers as well as fathers). Dads who work in the Financial and Insurance Services industry are the most likely to take primary parental leave (for mothers it is mining).

The industry with the lowest overall take up of primary parental leave among fathers was Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing (for mothers it was Public Administration and Safety).

8 per cent of dads whose youngest child was aged 0 to 5 years and 9 per cent of dads whose youngest child was aged 6 to 14 years are employed part-time. (This compares with 61 per cent and 50 per cent of mums respectively).

Sourced from Gender Indicators, Australia (cat. no. 4125.0).

 

 

 

Dads the word

Fathers are increasingly playing a family role in supporting the informal learning of their children, especially as children grow older.

In around 19 per cent of couple families with children aged 0-2, mums and dads equally shared their involvement in their children's informal learning, while dads took the lead in 6 per cent of families and mums took the lead in 67 per cent.

As the children grew older, dads grew more involved: in around 23 of couple families with children aged 3-8 mums and dads shared their involvement in their children's learning equally, while dads took the lead in 11 per cent, and mums in 64 per cent of these families (Childhood Education and Care, Australia, June 2017 (cat. no. 4402.0)).

In 2016 over three quarters of dads in couple families with children under 15 provided unpaid child care for their own children, up from 72 per cent a decade earlier (2016 and 2006 Census).

 

 

 

The multicultural face of fathers

Australian dads come from a wide range of places.

In 2016, 38 per cent of dads in couple families with children under 15 were born overseas, up from 31 per cent a decade earlier.

In 2016, around 20 per cent of dads who were born overseas were born in Southern Asia, with 13 per cent born in the UK and 8 per cent each born in Chinese Asia and New Zealand. This compares to 2016 when around 20 per cent of dads born overseas were born in the UK, 9 per cent in New Zealand with 7 per cent each born in Southern Asia, Middle East and Mainland South-East Asia.

Just over a quarter of single dads in 2016 with children under 15 were born overseas (27 per cent), with 17 per cent of these born in the UK, 12 per cent in NZ and 8 per cent in Chinese Asia. The overall proportion was similar to 2006 when it was 26 per cent, with 21 per cent of these born in the UK, 12 per cent in NZ and 7 per cent in Mainland South-East Asia.

Sourced from 2016 Census.

 

 

#Work

In 2016, dads of children under 15 were most likely to work in construction (16 per cent), while mums were most likely to work in health care and social assistance (23 per cent of mums in couple families and 25 per cent of single mums).

In 2006, dads of children under 15 were most likely to work in manufacturing (16 per cent), while mums were most likely to work in health care and social assistance (19 per cent of mums in couple families and 21 per cent of single mums).

Sourced from 2016 and 2006 Census.

Published in News
Wednesday, 29 August 2018 18:00

Flexible fathers

 

An increasing proportion of dads utilising flexible working arrangements to play a role in bring up children.

In 2017, 30 per cent of dads took advantage of flexible work hours to look after young children (under 12), compared with 16 per cent of dads in 1996..

Proportion of dads working from home to care for their children more than doubled over the same time (from 7 per cent to 15 per cent), while the proportion of dads who worked part-time to care for their children rose from 1 per cent to 5 per cent.

The proportion of families where fathers used work arrangements to care for their children increased from 26 per cent to 42 per cent over the past two decades, while those where mothers used work arrangements to care for their children remained constant at around 70 per cent across the same period.

Comparisons made between 1996 and 2017 sourced from Childhood Education and Care, Australia, June 2017 (cat. no. 4402.0)

Published in News

Archive