ABS seeking up to 38,000 Field Officers committed to making a difference ABS File

ABS seeking up to 38,000 Field Officers committed to making a difference Featured

The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) has begun a nationwide search for up to 38,000 enthusiastic people committed to making a difference in their community, as Field Officers for the 2016 Census of Population and Housing on Tuesday, 9 August 2016.

Field Officers will be strong communicators who know their local area well, and are comfortable using technology. Field Officers will follow up with households that don’t participate on Census night and support the collection and delivery of traditional paper forms in areas across Australia.

Head of the 2016 Census Program, Duncan Young said Field Officers are as important as ever in the 2016 Census, even though 65 per cent of Australians are expected to complete their Census online.

“Field Officers will be a critical part of the ABS’ efforts to count close to 10 million dwellings and approximately 24 million people across Australia on Census night,” Mr Young said.

“While most people will complete the Census online, Australia isn’t any smaller and we will still need Field Officers in every street, in every suburb and every town to both remind and help people complete their Census.”

“Being a Field Officer is a great opportunity to get outside, make a difference to your local area and help shape the future of Australia.”

Rebecca Tapper, who worked in remote Queensland as a Field Officer on the 2011 Census agrees, saying it was a chance of a lifetime.

“It’s a fantastic opportunity to see parts of Australia few people are privileged enough to see.”

“I get to meet new people, learn new skills and gain new experiences and insights,” Ms Tapper said.
The roles and responsibilities of field staff will reflect the changes to the 2016 Census and the digital-first approach.

“Field Officers will need to be comfortable using a computer, tablet or mobile device and have the ability to work from home. They will also use their own vehicle to move around a work area and be able to communicate in English,” Mr Young said.

Field Officers will earn up to $21.61 per hour, receive motor vehicle allowances and enjoy flexible working hours for up to 3 months.
Applicants must be Australian citizens or have the legal right to work in Australia, and hold a valid driver’s licence. To view the applicant information kits and to apply online, visit www.census.abs.gov.au. Applications close on 29 May 2016.

Background information on the 2016 Census of Population and Housing
Data collected from the 2016 Census will support funding decisions for services and infrastructure including housing, transport, education, industry, hospitals, and the environment.
Data from the 2011 Census revealed the most common industry of employment is School Education (467,373), and the most common language spoken at home other than English is Mandarin (336,410). What will the 2016 Census show?

For further information on the 2016 Census, visit www.abs.gov.au/census.
Key 2016 Census dates:
2 May 2016
Field Officer recruitment begins
Late July to early Aug 2016
Instruction letters and forms will be delivered
9 August 2016
Census night
Mid Aug to late Sept 2016
Field visits
April 2017
The first results from the 2016 Census released

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    All the single dads

    In 2016, 76 per cent of single dads with children under 15 worked 35 hours or more a week, compared with 87 per cent of dads in couple families with children under 15. This is a slight drop from 77 per cent and 90 per cent respectively a decade earlier.

    In comparison for 2016, 42 per cent of single mums with children under 15 worked 35 hours or more a week, compared with 38 per cent of mums in couple families with children under 15.

    This is increase from 39 per cent for single mums and no change (38 per cent) of mums in couple families with children under 15.
    Sourced from 2016 and 2006 Census.

     

     

     

     

    Leave in the labour force

    Levels of parental leave taken by fathers varies between occupation and industry.

    In 2016-17, managers were more likely to use parental leave than those in non-managerial roles (true for mothers as well as fathers). Dads who work in the Financial and Insurance Services industry are the most likely to take primary parental leave (for mothers it is mining).

    The industry with the lowest overall take up of primary parental leave among fathers was Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing (for mothers it was Public Administration and Safety).

    8 per cent of dads whose youngest child was aged 0 to 5 years and 9 per cent of dads whose youngest child was aged 6 to 14 years are employed part-time. (This compares with 61 per cent and 50 per cent of mums respectively).

    Sourced from Gender Indicators, Australia (cat. no. 4125.0).

     

     

     

    Dads the word

    Fathers are increasingly playing a family role in supporting the informal learning of their children, especially as children grow older.

    In around 19 per cent of couple families with children aged 0-2, mums and dads equally shared their involvement in their children's informal learning, while dads took the lead in 6 per cent of families and mums took the lead in 67 per cent.

    As the children grew older, dads grew more involved: in around 23 of couple families with children aged 3-8 mums and dads shared their involvement in their children's learning equally, while dads took the lead in 11 per cent, and mums in 64 per cent of these families (Childhood Education and Care, Australia, June 2017 (cat. no. 4402.0)).

    In 2016 over three quarters of dads in couple families with children under 15 provided unpaid child care for their own children, up from 72 per cent a decade earlier (2016 and 2006 Census).

     

     

     

    The multicultural face of fathers

    Australian dads come from a wide range of places.

    In 2016, 38 per cent of dads in couple families with children under 15 were born overseas, up from 31 per cent a decade earlier.

    In 2016, around 20 per cent of dads who were born overseas were born in Southern Asia, with 13 per cent born in the UK and 8 per cent each born in Chinese Asia and New Zealand. This compares to 2016 when around 20 per cent of dads born overseas were born in the UK, 9 per cent in New Zealand with 7 per cent each born in Southern Asia, Middle East and Mainland South-East Asia.

    Just over a quarter of single dads in 2016 with children under 15 were born overseas (27 per cent), with 17 per cent of these born in the UK, 12 per cent in NZ and 8 per cent in Chinese Asia. The overall proportion was similar to 2006 when it was 26 per cent, with 21 per cent of these born in the UK, 12 per cent in NZ and 7 per cent in Mainland South-East Asia.

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    #Work

    In 2016, dads of children under 15 were most likely to work in construction (16 per cent), while mums were most likely to work in health care and social assistance (23 per cent of mums in couple families and 25 per cent of single mums).

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    Sourced from 2016 and 2006 Census.

  • Have your say on Australia’s 2021 Census topics

     

    The five-yearly Census provides critical data and information to support important Australian decisions by governments, community organisations, businesses and individuals.
    The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) is reviewing the information collected in the 2021 Census of Population and Housing to ensure it best meets our nation’s needs and informs Australia’s important decisions.

    A public consultation, launched today through the ABS website, seeks input from data users, community groups and organisations on their data needs and the most useful information to collect in the 2021 Census.

    Population and Social Statistics General Manager Dr Paul Jelfs said, “It’s important that our nation’s largest statistical collection remains relevant and meets users’ needs”.

    “Submissions can be easily made via the ABS consultation hub,” Dr Jelfs said.

    The ABS will assess any changes suggested through the submission process based on evidence and demonstrated need. We will seek to minimise the burden on the community by managing the number and complexity of questions asked in the Census.

     “It’s wonderful to see quality 2016 Census data being used widely and this consultation process is about ensuring our 2021 Census data is even more valuable and useful,” Dr Jelfs said.

    “The Census adds to the wealth of knowledge from other ABS data collections,” Dr Jelfs said.

    The ABS has been undertaking a comprehensive review of the operation of the 2016 Census and has identified areas of improvement for 2021. As we work towards 2021, the ABS will share our approach to how people can participate in the Census, our approach to ensuring privacy and security of information and how we provide the final Census results.

    Submissions on 2021 Census topics close on 30 June. Following analysis, the ABS will publish preliminary findings from this consultation process then make recommendations to the Australian Government.

    Details on how to participate, including instructions for making your submission and frequently asked questions are available online at http://www.abs.gov.au/census-consult

    The Census of Population and Housing: Consultation on Content 2021 publication provides detailed information on the topics.

    For access to the latest Census data, please visit www.abs.gov.au/census.

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